Author Archives: AROW

Join the AROW list!

Are you a Portland resident concerned about how we use our public right-of-way?

Join the AROW list.

You can also follow AROW on social media to stay up to date with opportunities to protect and improve Portland’s transportation infrastructure.


Metro seeking applicants for Transportation Policy Advisory Committee

Scott writes on Portland Transport:

It’s fall, which means that Metro is seeking citizen applicants to serve on the Transportation Policy Advisory Committee. There are four openings.

According to Metro:

TPAC is an advisory committee that reviews regional plans and federally funded transportation projects across the three-county Portland area. It advises local and regional leaders on transportation spending priorities as well as policies related to transportation, such as efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions and create communities with easy access to public transit. It also recommends needs and opportunities for involving the public in transportation matters.An essential responsibility of TPAC is to advise the Joint Policy Advisory Committee on Transportation, JPACT, a panel of elected officials and transportation agency executives that controls federal transportation spending in the Portland area. TPAC also advises the Metro Council, which reviews and must approve all major JPACT actions.

Application materials are available here.

Reclaiming The Right of Way: Parklet Best Practices Report Released

Robin writes:

Researches from UCLA have put together a manual for how to build parklets based on best practices from the US and Canada.

From the article:

Researchers have also created a new report, “Reclaiming The Right of Way,” which compiles best practices from cities in the U.S and Canada that have implemented parklet projects in their communities. These projects, which enhance neighborhoods through low-cost, small-scale inventions, were pioneered in San Francisco but have also appeared in New York, Philadelphia, and Vancouver, B.C., among other cities.

Read further and download the report.

Bringing 82nd Avenue Under Local Authority

ODOT to PBOT ownership

Josh writes:

One of the often mentioned obstacles to improving 82nd Avenue is that it’s under ODOT jurisdiction. Your attendance at this meeting will help give our public officials the clear message that we want 82nd to be under the City of Portland’s jurisdiction. Getting these public officials talking with each other will start the process moving.

Meeting Announcement: 82nd Avenue Transportation Workshop

Purpose: To learn about the process needed to transfer jurisdiction of 82nd Avenue from ODOT to the City of Portland.

Format: Panel discussion with public officials and state legislators about how to move ahead on this issue. Also, information on ODOT’s currently planned safety projects for 82nd will be available.

Who: Sponsored by the Montavilla Neighborhood Association and the 82nd Avenue Business Association. Panel will include Tom Miller, Portland’s Director of Transportation, State Senator Jackie Dingfelder, and Shelli Romero of ODOT.

When: September 24 at 7:00 PM

Where: Montavilla Methodist Church – 232 SE 80th.

We ask that contacts and participants to the workshop think in advance about and send us a list of three concerns or problems you have with 82nd Avenue; and three questions you have about the transfer issue.  You’re encouraged to leave those questions and concerns in the comments below.

Fixing the intersection at NE Broadway, Flint and Wheeler

We first met Paramount apartments owner and citizen activist Betsy Reese through our work on streetcar bikeway safety. Betsy has been working tirelessly for many years to improve conditions for people on bike and foot in her neighborhood.

Here is a video Betsy’s son Will put together demonstrating the chaotic and confusing conditions on the ground in front of the Paramount apartments.

Thankfully, PBOT has been responsive to calls for improving this intersection immediately, particularly in light of the high rate of bicycle-car collisions at this location.  As Jonathan Maus writes:

PBOT staff reviewed every recorded collision from the DMV and the Police between 2000 and 2010 and there were 20 serious bike/motor-vehicle collisions. 17 of those 20 were right hooks at Wheeler.

The momentum appears headed toward closing NE Wheeler permanently.  This is welcome news to neighborhood activists, some of whom are still dismayed that the city intends to move forward with an I-5 highway-widening project next door.  Stay tuned.