Posts Tagged ‘portland’

Submit Your Comments on the Comprehensive Plan by Dec 31

Posted in News on December 19th, 2013 by Steve – Comments Off on Submit Your Comments on the Comprehensive Plan by Dec 31
According to the Comp Plan Website, "The Comprehensive Plan is a state-mandated land use and conservation, transportation, and capital projects plan for Portland. It is one of a set of important tools for implementing the Portland Plan priorities and guiding policies, both of which provide significant direction for the content of the Comprehensive Plan."

According to the Comp Plan Website, “The Comprehensive Plan is a state-mandated land use and conservation, transportation, and capital projects plan for Portland. It is one of a set of important tools for implementing the Portland Plan priorities and guiding policies, both of which provide significant direction for the content of the Comprehensive Plan.”

A reminder to get your comments in on the Comp Plan map website before Dec 31, 2013 when the comment period ends.

What’s Inside?

  • The Map App is a way for you to explore maps of the city and help determine what Portland could look like and how it should grow over the next 20 years.
  • Use the Map App to learn more about anticipated new housing or job development and where the City may want to invest in new infrastructure, like water, sewer, parks and streets.
  • Your ideas can shape how Portland will grow over the next 20 years.
  • Leave your comments on the maps to inform the City’s Comprehensive Plan Update.

Invest in Bikes: An Important Graph for Advocates

Posted in Advocate's Toolbox, News on March 2nd, 2012 by Steve – Comments Off on Invest in Bikes: An Important Graph for Advocates

Roger Geller, PBOT Bicycle Coordinator, shared this graph at last year’s Oregon Active Transportation Summit.  A year later it remains a pivotal resource for those who are considering bike funding in our local transportation budget battle.

Regional Metro, ODOT, Trimet + Local Agency Expenditures and New Trips – Active Transportation, Transit and Motor Vehicles

Williams Avenue: Lessons for Advocates

Posted in News on November 27th, 2011 by Steve – Comments Off on Williams Avenue: Lessons for Advocates

The public process around the North Williams Avenue Corridor Safety Project has been greatly expanded, in large part due to PBOT listening to the concerns of local residents.  While frustrating to those who are eager to see improvements, an extended public process is a resounding success for local democracy.

It is important that transportation safety advocates stay involved and engage with their neighbors and city officials about the larger social justice issues raised thus far, issues which are not entirely disconnected from transportation decision making.  The upcoming community forum provides a space to share with city officials and community members alike the pain imposed on our city’s black community from decades of neglect and disempowerment.  The forum also challenges people who walk and bike regularly to share their safety concerns and hopes for a safer Williams Avenue.

I hope active transportation advocates will appreciate and take advantage of these new opportunities for public input, as we have asked yet not received for the Columbia River Crossing and I-5 Rose Quarter freeway expansions.

This process has brought out many truths, one of which is that many Portlanders perceive the bicycle as a toy of privilege rather than a tool of empowerment.  Sharp advocates will see this as a call to action. It is upon the active transportation community to build better relationships with local communities-of-color, and the process begins with listening. read more »

Strong Support for Lloyd District Bikeway Projects

Posted in News on May 20th, 2011 by AROW – Comments Off on Strong Support for Lloyd District Bikeway Projects

Three tremendously important bikeway projects in the Lloyd District are currently under consideration by the Portland Bureau of Transportation.  We believe this trio of complete-the-streets projects will repair an often dubious neighborhood to navigate via bicycle.

We penned a letter to voice broad support for this project, while also addressing a misconception that these bikeway improvements could be bad for business.  In fact, Portland’s experience has been the opposite: bikeways mean business!  Read the letter for more detail on our reasoning, and review the benefits of investing in bikeways on our fact sheet.

You are encouraged to submit your own letter of support for safety improvements in the Lloyd District to PBOT Project Manager Ellen Vanderslice.

Being Active on the Statewide Level: Reflections from last week

Posted in News, Thoughts on April 9th, 2011 by Michael – Comments Off on Being Active on the Statewide Level: Reflections from last week

Ted asked How did last week go for transportation advocacy? He shared his impression of lobbying in Salem as part of the Oregon Active Transportation Summit:

AROW joined allies in Salem to talk with Rep Lew Frederick about legislative priorities, as part of the Oregon Active Transportation Summit's lobbying day.

AROW joined allies in Salem to talk with Rep Lew Frederick about legislative priorities, as part of the Oregon Active Transportation Summit's lobbying day.

There were over 200 attendees at the workshops on Tuesday, and probably 75 people visiting their elected officials on Wednesday.

I’ve never met my state reps and senators before, anywhere I’ve ever lived. They’re nice, down to earth folks, with about 2 staffers each. We wandered up to their offices with about 10 constituents, and had 15 minutes of their time to introduce ourselves and ask for their support with some minor legislation.

Rep. Lew Frederickson from inner NE Portland was a friendly sort, and spent a fair bit of time talking with the 3 CCC employees about his perceptions of bikes, getting people on bikes, and ethnic relations. Helpful and interesting for all of us. Senator Chip Shields looked to be about 35 years old, is a bicyclist, and seemed straight-up enough. I also visited Rep Tina Kotek, who is a staunch CRC supporter (represents N Portland and NE north of Lombard St), and tried not to tie up much of the groups time as I tried to correct some of her assertions about how good the CRC is.

Ted’s story inspired me to share my own reflections on getting involved in Oregon politics at the regional and statewide level.

Some legislators are better than others about providing opportunities for access. My OR House rep, Michael Dembrow, regularly schedules “Constituent Coffees” around his district, which is great for providing state-level advocacy opportunities without having to travel to Salem. I would urge anyone who lives in his NE Portland district to get on his mailing list. Actually, anyone interested in doing more advocacy on any level should probably make sure they are on their representatives’ mailing lists.

The City of Portland sponsored an excellent “Advocacy 101” workshop in January, hosted by Amanda Fritz and ONI and featuring Sen. Ginny Burdick. Materials from the workshop are online here.

Various advocacy organizations host trainings on effective advocacy techniques. One of the best I’ve attended was by the Partnership for Safety & Justice. Their specific messaging isn’t related to transportation issues, but the skills they teach are transferable to any sort of advocacy you might want to do. I’m sure that’s true for a lot of these kinds of trainings and workshops, and maybe people have other suggestions about other groups they’ve worked with who do this well.

This is all pretty new to me, I’ve mostly only been involved on the city level before this year, and minimally on the county level. But already I’ve been to Salem four times in two months and am going again in two weeks. Again, none of this has been related to transportation issues, but it would be cool to learn how to incorporate transportation advocacy into what I’m already trying to work on. Personally, I see the issues as being inter-connected, even if a lot of other people don’t necessarily see them that way.

In any event, it is always interesting to get a closer, more involved view of how the process works, even if it isn’t always pretty.